Innocent spouse

The statute of limitations on collection will make most every IRS collection problem come to an end.  Internal Revenue Code 6502 puts a limit on how long the IRS can pursue the collection of a tax debt. The timeframe is 10 years from when the IRS puts a liability on its books. But knowing there […]

Read More

When the IRS gets you with a levy, bad things can happen – your wages are frozen and you are looking at living without a paycheck. The money you need to pay bills is suddenly swiped out of your bank account. This presents an urgent dilemma requiring immediate relief. So, what are the two quickest […]

Read More

If you owe the IRS and have a refund on your tax return, the IRS will keep the refund and apply it to your unpaid taxes.  The problem is not repaying the debt – you would if you could – but that you simply cannot afford to lose the refund.  The refund is needed to […]

Read More

Your name is signed on a joint tax return, but the signature is not yours.  Your spouse signed your name, but did you agree to it? This becomes a problem if there are taxes owed on the return from your spouse, and the IRS starts coming after you for it.   That can be a big surprise […]

Read More

Tax problems do come to an end – the IRS has 10 years to collect a tax debt.   But be careful:  The time the IRS has to collect can be unknowingly extended by you.  The decisions you make in attempting to resolve your tax problem can impact when it ends.  As your collection statute gets closer to expiring, carefully think […]

Read More

IRS problems and divorce often come bundled together.  Here is my response to a question I recieved about how a divorce decree impacts the IRS in the collection of an unpaid tax liablity: My ex was self-employed when we were married, and he never paid his taxes. I made the mistake of signing joint returns. […]

Read More
Page 1 of 212