Tax liens

If an IRS tax lien is hurting your credit, or stopping you from purchasing a house or car, the IRS offers a path to freedom. The IRS will withdraw the lien from public record in the following circumstances: 1.     The amount you owe is under $25,000.   But this is flexible – see […]

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The general rule is that a Federal tax lien attaches to all of your property.  But there are exceptions – known as “superpriorities” – situations in which you can sell your property even though the IRS has filed a tax lien against you. The tax code will allow you to sell your car to a […]

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Making it through an IRS audit is stressful and anxiety ridden, but for many, it is not the end of the road in dealing with the IRS.  Many IRS audits result in balances due.  Here are my responses to great questions from a reader about dealing with IRS collections after the audit. I just finished […]

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The Internal Revenue Code does not make it easy to understand how Federal tax liens work.  Hopefully, that is what I am here for. The starting point to understanding your tax lien is to know that it lasts for the amount of time the IRS has to collect from you – 10 years.  After the […]

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Here is a situation from a reader showing why location counts when it comes to Federal tax lien filings: The IRS has filed a tax lien against me where I live in Hamilton County, Ohio.  But I own real estate in North Carolina, and there are no tax liens filed against me there.  Does the IRS have to file a lien in […]

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The IRS has two ways to collect back taxes:  a Federal tax lien and tax levy.  A tax lien is different from an IRS levy – the lien does not result in the IRS taking your property from you.  That is done by levy. You have rights to defend the filing of a lien, and prevent the issuance of a levy.  To be able […]

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